How I Got the Shot: The Accidental Homage to Kinkade

 

I enjoy shooting commercial photography, but due to my area (rural mid-Michigan) I seldom get to shoot much which would fall under that category. A few years ago in late 2013 and early 2014 I was commissioned to shoot images of the exteriors of various churches which were part of the Church of Daniel’s Band (a non-denominational church with its roots in Methodism which I grew up attending). I knew shooting these images at midday would result in boring images. Instead I opted to shoot them during the “blue hour” (as us photographers call it) shortly after sunset when everything has a bluer tint to it. This would create contrast between the warm tungsten bulbs lighting the interior of the church and cool evening light hitting the exterior. I also wanted the church to have some shape and dimension to it as well. To achieve that look I used my Alienbee B1600 flash to light the part of the church with the entrance door. I placed the flash far enough back that the light would spread and light that entire side of the church. This made that side of the church slightly lighter giving the church some dimension (making it look more three dimensional). The light put off by my strobe is daylight balanced (which means it looks white to my camera) so I had to adjust the colors in post making the strobes match the ambient blue light. Looking back now I could have also attached a CTB (color temperature blue) gel to the light to minimize my time in Photoshop correcting the colors. I also added a moon to the sky in the background in post to add to the night time look. After showing this image to various people many have commented that it reminds them of Thomas Kinkade’s paintings. People have made similar comments about other night (images taken shortly after sunset during the “blue hour”) images of mine that they remind them of Kinkade’s work. I’ve been aware of Kinkade’s work for years but none of my “blue hour” shots have been intended as an intentional homage to his work (even though I’ve always liked his work). He and I use a similar technique to make our images shot (or in his case painted at this time of day) look dramatic. The natural color contrast between the warn interior light and the cold exterior light always makes for dynamic engaging images regardless of medium.

Shot using a Nikon D600 with a Sigma 28-70mm f/2.8 Lens on a Feisol Carbon Fiber CT-3371 Tripod with a Kirk B3 Ball Head with an L bracket. Lit with an Alienbee B1600 triggered with Radio Poppers and powered with a Vagabond Mini. As I’ve stated before I quit using Radio Poppers in 2016 and switched to the cheaper and more reliable Yongnuo triggers. ISO 100 28mm f/10 0.8 of a second shutter speed.

 

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Photographer/Retoucher at Ryan Watkins Photography
Ryan Watkins Photography specializes in portrait and wedding photography catering to Clare, Mt Pleasant, and Midland, Michigan. Ready to travel anywhere in the state. 

Graduate from the Hallmark Institute of Photography and Highest Academic Honor recipient. 

Published in several magazines including Shutterbug, Digital Photo, Outdoor Photographer, and PDNedu. 
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